🔥 Recovery in Gamblers Anonymous | Ferentzy | Journal of Gambling Issues

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C = Closed (Only open to those that admit to a Gambling Problem). O = Open (​Open to the Public, Compulsive Gamblers, family and supporting friends).


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anonymous and open to anyone, including family members or concerned friends. include peer-based approaches such as Gamblers Anonymous (where you meet with Canadian Mental Health Association, Simcoe County Branch.


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Ottawa Gamblers Anonymous website. Anonymous information for Ottawa area compulsive gamblers including Ottawa area Gamblers anonymous meeting list.


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Mandate: Gamblers anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their The main purpose is to help compulsive gamblers stop gambling. Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB) – NL Division; Canadian Red Cross.


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Mandate: Gamblers anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their The main purpose is to help compulsive gamblers stop gambling. Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB) – NL Division; Canadian Red Cross.


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On their website, Gamblers Anonymous provides a list of 20 questions that will References to websites not produced by Focus on the Family Canada are for.


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On their website, Gamblers Anonymous provides a list of 20 questions that will References to websites not produced by Focus on the Family Canada are for.


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Meetings for people with gambling addictions * meetings follow the twelve steps to recovery to help compulsive gamblers beat their addiction.


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anutka-17.ru Gamblers Anonymous Canada () GA-HELPS (​) (Calgary hotline) () (Southern Alberta hotline) ().


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GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common​.


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If newcomers are present, they may be asked GA's 20 Questions a diagnostic tool designed to determine whether someone is a compulsive gambler or asked simply to read the questions and to think about them during and after the meeting. For these and other reasons, some GA members—even after 20 years of abstinence—are in a position where their spouses refuse to let them control more than nominal amounts of money. One member, when asked why some do not succeed in GA, had this to say:. One of GA's most striking features is the length of its main text.{/INSERTKEYS}{/PARAGRAPH} It may also take a gambler longer to earn the trust of family members. Anything associated with the mystical can be reminiscent of the mystification endemic to a problem gambler's mindset with respect to odds, hunches, or good luck charms. This qualitative, month ethnographic study was preceded by the compilation of an annotated bibliography of GA and mutual aid as it pertains to gambling problems. The first A is designed to provide some background information on GA and is delivered as a list of six important themes. This section contains two parts. Whereas AA leaves it up to the individual to decide whether or not it is safe to enter establishments where alcohol is served, GA's official stand on such questions is uncompromising: members should not enter, or even go near, gambling establishments. While the timelines vary, the latter scenario is something for which the new GA member may have to prepare. Again, patience is key. The latter might actually happen after about a year of abstinence and the person may then be working on Step 3 or 4 , but the point is that newcomers are consistently warned against impatience and much less often against procrastination. And they get the power of example and the hope and everything … And they fall off before they start looking, and working the steps. Here, even meetings are treated primarily as a means to achieve patience. {PARAGRAPH}{INSERTKEYS}This article was written to provide an overview of recovery in Gamblers Anonymous GA. As mentioned, in GA patience is key, and the 12 Steps are treated to a large extent as an exercise in patience. Yet GA's approach to the 12 Steps and recovery is unique. GA is a mutual aid organization modeled upon Alcoholics Anonymous AA , though differing in some ways from that organization. All but two GA members interviewed, even those who do not work the 12 Steps, agreed that those who do work the steps are better off spiritually and emotionally. In GA, finding a balance between both impulses is an ongoing struggle. The last and probably most important page in that text, page 17, can be viewed as a summary of the Combo Book—another exercise in concision. The study had two main components: participant observation and individual interviews. GA emphasizes in strong terms that one has a gambling problem and not a money problem. GA is more guarded about potential relapse triggers than many other 12 Step fellowships. Brown , a, b, c has explored the reasons many new members leave GA. There's something that speaks to you, you know, depending on your frame of mind, depending on how the page is being read, or even who's reading the page. So those who perceive their problem as primarily financial will in most cases either change this view or eventually leave GA, with or without a bailout, simply because they do not identify with the GA program. For this reason, there is a countertendency in GA—consistent with GA's official position GAISO, , —to emphasize that the amount of money gambled is relative and not an absolute indicator of the seriousness of someone's gambling problem. On the one hand, they are urged to be patient and to take their time in all aspects of their recovery, while on the other they are warned against the hazards of procrastination. A recurring warning among GA members is not to move from Step 1 admission of powerlessness immediately to Step 12 passing on the message to other gamblers. Recovery in GA can be seen as a complex interaction between the 12 Steps and the messages primarily concerning patience and abstinence found on page Normally, recovery would begin with Step 1—the admission that one is a compulsive gambler, aided by GA's 20 Questions—and then turn quickly to the instructions on page 17 some of which could be perceived as parts of, or additions to, Step 1. While GA has changed since then, page 17 is still central, with patience possibly being its most important message. This was a qualitative study using a relatively small interview sample, designed to generate preliminary findings that could later be verified with formal methods employing larger samples. When asked which item on page 17 he considered most important, another member over 7 years abstinent replied,. This suggests that GA newcomers may face conflicting advice. Many long-standing GA members tend to view themselves as vulnerable to relapse and hence in need of taking precautions. For reasons already discussed, GA treats this virtue as key to a gambler's recovery. While substance addicts in recovery must clearly learn to resist the instant gratification offered by the substance, GA members must be doubly on guard against such impulses: beyond the immediate thrill associated with gambling, there is the very real possibility that large winnings could indeed solve many problems immediately. For example, they say, newer members who have abstained for a week will often express outrage at not being trusted by their spouses, despite having pursued their destructive behavior for many years. Notably, two of our GA interviewees were from other North American locales, and the principal investigator engaged in informal phone and e-mail communications with GA members from across the continent. Perhaps his most notable observation is that members who seem very elated at their first meeting are more likely to leave than those with a balanced first impression. To quote a long-standing 35 years GA member:. And every time you read it there's a different meaning to it. All interviews were audiotaped. Yet there is a difference. Compulsive gamblers are generally in difficult financial straits by the time they decide to make a change, and the temptation to solve problems quickly can jeopardize a gambler's recovery. You know, because it's kind of a magical book. Reasons for this are discussed below. There's a different understanding. Some gamblers are said to be looking for excuses which they inevitably find , and others are said to receive financial bailouts—something against which GA warns emphatically—and then consider their problem solved. This article is a discussion of GA's approach to recovery. Several informants reported that they were also in this state of mind when they arrived, and one confessed that he would not have remained if not for his mistaken belief that GA might eventually pay his debts. Like most GA members, this person had huge debts to pay—gamblers, more so than many other addicts, must understand that it may take time to set things right. Money can be an issue, especially for women. Well because they can't seem to make the transformation from the initial rush, the initial excitement, of finding a lot of people like themselves that had gone through the same experiences. Still, this study was regionally limited, and the advent of slot machines seems to have changed GA's character in some regions, raising potential questions our research team has yet to answer. There was a strong association between 12 Step work and reported life satisfaction as well as not missing gambling at all. You know—every time you read the Combo Book you get one step closer to understanding it. If several newcomers are present, and especially if many ask for feedback, such interaction may dominate the rest of the meeting. For obvious reasons, an attitude of avoiding quick fixes can be important to recovery from drugs and alcohol. There are many reasons for this. Our concern in what follows is with how GA's distinctive approach to the 12 Steps reflects the recovery needs of compulsive gamblers. This statement is telling for two reasons: first, there is an implicit critique of GA's slow-paced approach; second, it is consistent with Brown's observation that those who are overly elated at their first encounter with GA may in fact be less successful in the long run. Reasons for these differences are discussed. While these efforts do not negate the regional bias, we have cause to believe that the bulk of our observations apply to many, if not all, North American regions. And they can't seem to get to the steps, the 12 Steps of Recovery, fast enough. On average, the male GA members report having bet larger amounts, and a few are even said to belittle the seriousness of smaller bets even in cases where these bets were made by someone with less money at their disposal. While formats vary, a typical GA meeting starts with members taking turns reading from the Combo Book GAISO, , which is really a pamphlet 9 cm by 14 cm and only 17 pages long. Gambling is not only a quick fix in the sense that it may provide an escape or a thrill, it can conceivably be a source of quick revenue—and this temptation can spell death for a gambler. One theme that distinguishes GA from many other 12 Step fellowships is that of patience. Beyond that, much of this article addresses issues by means of explicating GA literature in conjunction with our own findings—with the effect that our observations are interpreted in relation to themes that clearly apply to GA in general. Such tales cause some members to think that, since their misfortunes are not so extreme, maybe they do not need help or are not true compulsive gamblers. Despite recent changes, GA still puts comparatively more emphasis on pure abstinence. Another feature that distinguishes GA is a seemingly more rigorous approach to avoiding potential triggers, notably gambling establishments. As mentioned, GA has tended to take what could be called a pragmatic approach. AA, for example, does not tell members to refrain from entering bars, whereas on page 17 GA members are told to not even go near gambling establishments. Only those steps relevant to this end are discussed, that is, Steps 1 to 6 and As practiced in GA, the 12 Steps are to a large degree geared toward teaching patience. Further, in GA the identification will usually be followed by an account of one's time abstinent which is much rarer in AA and NA. Observational and interview strategies were revised in response to what had been uncovered. GA also seems to gear 12 Step work to recovery needs associated with gambling. You know there seems to be a lag between … some people get the excitement of the program when they first come in. I think that's where we lose a lot of people. And you know the stories—all the rush that we get when we first come into GA. GA members also theorized that those who drop out may not begin practicing the 12 Steps quickly enough. Informal discussions during and after meetings with GA members, notably those with experience in other 12 Step fellowships, were also significant to this study. How GA's approach reflects the distinctive needs of compulsive gamblers is a central theme. The principal investigator attended and documented the activity and discourse at 42 GA meetings in the Toronto area and conducted 27 interviews with GA members, three of whom were also long-standing members of Alcoholics Anonymous AA. However, the Combo Book is a masterly exercise in concision and thereby reflects GA's traditionally no-nonsense approach to recovery. It's only when you jump from Step 1 to Step 12, and forget about all the ones in between, that there's a problem—a very serious problem. As with other 12 Step fellowships, GA members give their first names and acknowledge their addiction before speaking. Some new members enter GA believing that the fellowship might actually pay their debts. A grounded theory approach Glaser, was used to generate observations and hypotheses about the meanings embedded in typical GA narratives and the ways members use them to overcome their addictions and to make sense of their lives. You know some people, some people, and thank God, can be on Step 1 for a year. As mentioned, it is simply more pressing to the GA member. The idea is that without the emotional growth brought about by embarking on the 12 Steps, the problems associated with early recovery from gambling are overwhelming. Usually, however, the chair will propose a topic—possible themes are regaining one's family's trust, abstinence, a particular step, helping newcomers the options are countless —and members will share on the given topic, or something else if they choose, for the duration of the meeting.